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Friday, October 25, 2013

There's another row of wood behind this one and both rows  extend beyond
        
                 I asked the Buddha, "What did you do                  
                         before    Enlightenment?"
                                         
                                                            Chop wood
                                                            Carry water
          
                            And what do you do after enlightenment?
                      
                                                           Chop wood
                                                           Carry water
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Getting ready for winter as it will be here next week.  A lot of trees at the ranch decided to give up the ghost. Now the electric log splitter cometh forth. That log splitter is neat and I can handle it. I can't do the axe thing. Wimp.

I grew up with woodpiles and they were significant in my life...... kinda like electric lights were to some people. Hahaha  Wood piles were a great place to climb to the top, sit and think.  They were usually in the shape of a mountain when the wood was split by hand and just thrown into a pile. There was also a saw dust pile whose fragrance would drive one into a wood nymphs ecstasy.

That was then but it's now. I didn't even light the stove once last winter. The thermostat seems to do the trick but it's reassuring to know there will be heat if a solar flare hits or TSHTF for any other reason.
Do you do the wood thing?

67 comments:

  1. What a lovely post Manzi! We do do the wood thing. We had a new woodburner installed this year (had an
    Open fire before that) and hubby made a log store behind the garage. It's still pretty warm here, but we'll be nice and cosy when the temps drop! We've got so many trees, that we'll never run out of wood. Love it that you use the electric log splitter. Hubby won't let me use his chainsaw. He says me+chainsaw=chainsaw massacre! Boo!

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    1. thisisme
      I remember when you got a new wood stove. wonderful to have for emergencies in a cold climate. We are in the tail end of Indian Summer but I hear next week the high's will be in the 20's...... So many things always left to the very end. It is comforting to have your own wood...... so many trees dying now and that makes me sad. I wouldn't advice you to use the chain saw either Once I started the chainsaw and it had a mind of it's own. It just took off in the air, dragging me along. Mine could have been a massacre too so I stay far away from it. I think both of us leave a safer world when we stay away from chainsaws. LOL
      May you have an enchanting weekend.

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    2. Crumbs, that chainsaw incident must have been really frightening for you my friend ! I don't feel so bad now that I wasn't allowed to use it.

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  2. We had a wood stove when I was little and I have fond memories of it. I loved the smell of all the wood we had piled on the porch to be burned those winters. Good times :)

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    1. Keith
      A wood fire is the best for cooking too. It gives peace to the cooking food and passes it onto us. Natural gas cooks food evenly and also gives peace. Electricity for cooking is next on the list and many people use that option but it has many objections. Microwave cooking is erratic and makes the cooked food crazy. Humans should not eat crazy food.

      I'm happy for your childhood memories of the wood fire and the wood piled on the porch, waiting it's turn to supply the heat for your family. May these images be in your mind forever and sustain you when you need them.

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  3. You call yourself a wimp because you use an electric splitter instead of an axe?? What does that make me? When we had a wood heater we bought wood by the trailer load. no axe wielding or any other wielding.
    We bought mallee stumps, put one in the heater at night, turn it down and that would glow all night and the house would be toasty warm in the mornings. Well, the living room and kitchen would be.

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    1. River
      I just think chopping wood is a good exercise but I'm not very accurate with sharp instruments. Wood gives off such a peaceful heat and I'm sure that is why we have loving memories of our younger days and wood fires. I don't exactly know what a mallee stump is, but I can imagine. On those cold mornings, did you bring your clothes by the fire and there get dressed for the day? I always did. Ha
      Thanks for your great words. You always leave warm and wonderful comments.

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  4. That wood pile could take one through an Apocalypse. I had a fireplace in Florida that got cranked up at first hint of chilly. Love to watch the flames leap. Here where I could really use a fireplace, I don't have one. Sure miss it.

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    1. The fires are lovely but that means hauling ashes. I bet a fireplace would be helpful in your climate. My stove is a powerhouse and heats everything (when I use it)...hahaha

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  5. Well it certainly looks like you are ready for the cold months ahead.... and other things. If push comes to shove... I will start chopping up my furniture and burn it for heat in my fireplace.

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    1. Terry
      so many trees at the ranch died from the chemical stuff .... in fact that whole area is almost bare of trees from that. I have seriously heard of people here, chopping their furniture in an emergency to keep warm here, What I wish I had is one of those old fashioned cook stoves that you can cook on and they keep the whoe place warm. geez, they bake the best bread. i had one that my aunt left to me but it was in South Dakota and it was too heavy to move around.

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  6. Never done the wood thing Manzanita and can't remember when I saw an open fire or wood burner last - childhood probably.
    Do understand that sweet fresh aroma of sawdust...
    Anna :o]

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    1. Anna
      Most people in larger communities do not bother with burning wood. My community is small and people tend to cling to some old fashioned ways. Most people, too, keep a source of heat for emergencies because our climate is harsh. You must have smelled sawdust before. Hahaha

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  7. I LOVE a fire in the fireplace, but we live in the big city so it's easier to burn compressed wood logs!!

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    1. Fishducky
      I had so very many trees that died and had to cut them before the place was sold..... that is the reason for all the wood Believe it or not, my little old pickup hauled all that wood to town. I've never burned those compressed logs. I gues they last a long, long time and look pretty.

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  8. I HATED wood as kid, had to drag the crap from here to there and pile the crap, then drag it indoors and pile the crap, then drag it again when it was gone, blah and blah some more. I'll never do the wood thing again, enough for one lifetime. Rather freeze haha although I did climb the piles and chuck some around accidentally whacking my brother in the head with a piece lol

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    1. Pat
      Kids.... they love to whack each other. You really did some dragg'n. I'm not too keen thinking about dragg'n ashes so that is why I didn't use it last year. So you'd rather freeze..... mention that again when it's 30 below. I'll send you some wood. lol

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  9. I love my fireplace...I have to move a rug, just a tad. Turn the key slightly to the left. Get my lighter going and walaaaaaa! My gas fireplace lights right up...hahaha!!! I'm a reeeel wimp and love it!

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    1. turquoisemoon
      You have the formula down, to every turn and sound. What a girl. Cozy in gas heat while the snow flakes are dancing against your window pain. Couldn't be finer.

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  10. I have been known to use a wood stove, not any more though

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    Replies
    1. Holy Ghost
      You live in a more sophisticated city than mine. Most people here keep wood stoves.

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  11. Living in Florida, I just don't worry about freezing to death. Unlike other places, if TSHTF you can always dive under the blankets and be okay.

    In other news, did you send me an email? I responded but then nothing happened and now I wonder if was you....

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    Replies
    1. Robin
      I did. I just didn't get around to following through on that. Thank you. There is so much last minute outdoor work to do when you know the highs next week will be 20. Life is Florida was much easier but not as satisfying ....for me. Hope you dont have to duck under the covers.

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  12. We don't have a fireplace or a woodburner, but we do have a pile of logs out back from a tree hubby took down. :)

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    1. Rosey
      There is your emergency wood pile. Then you won't have to chop up your furniture. LOL

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  13. Wood heat feels wonderful. But then I am so darn allergic to trees that it's just not worth it. Yeah I know- living in the northwest and allergic to trees?! haha. My fireplace is now gas.
    I do have fond memories of the old woodpiles as well. We do what we do and what we have to, don't we?

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    1. Jasmine
      That's a bummer..... never heard of tree allergies but then, why not. Of course, their blooms, etc. I have this intense love affair with trees and keep planting them and trying to save them. But when they die up where the ranch is/was/ before /whatever people want them cut down because of forest fires. I had so many that had to be cut and I just brought some of the wood into town. I didn't plan on all that wood. If there is ever an emergency I can help the neighbors out.

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  14. Hi Manzanita,

    When I lived in British Columbia, I most certainly did the wood thing. I get them chopped and place them in my wood-burning stove. Heated the whole house and the smell, the warmth, the watching the embers glow though the glass, brings back memories.

    What a nice post. I wood say that. And woodpiles? Had them once, it was painful.

    A nice, warm weekend to you, dear friend.

    Gary :)

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    1. Gary
      You had a peaceful existence in Canada and yet you ended up in Britain I'm such a home body. You must be getting ready for colder weather and putting your garden in winter mode. I've done all I'm going to do here.
      Have the perfect weekend.


      Now what can't I look at words as in the eyes of a humorous person????? I would have never thought of woodpiles or any kind of piles. Clever mind you have.

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  15. I head to the islands for the winter and leave stoking the wood stove to the kid who stays home. Hope you keep warm.

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    1. Rosemary
      I wonder if your summer zipped by like mine did and now you are ready to travel again. I know you enjoy the water travel . My husband had a boat for ten years and I never set foot on it. It's way too confining for me and his relatives were always eager to go places with him. He didn't mind that I didn't like the water so our marriage was good. Actually probably better when we had some time to ourselves. Enjoy your winter visiting islands.

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  16. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  17. Woods are truly useful not only use for cooking and building for getting warm but also for creating some incredible..

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    1. Cutella
      I see what you mean. I stopped at your block and the wood jars are truly beautiful and useful. Thank you for stopping by.

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  18. We don't have a wood pile but we do have an emergency coal store even though we don't have open fires any more. Those piles of wood are also excellent homes for insects in the winter and I've seen lots of them in Nature Reserves here.

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    1. Rosalind
      It is always comforting to have a source of heat on hand in the cold winds of winter. Coal would do it too. I notice squirrels love to run about on the woodpile too.

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  19. I love the fence line in your header photo. It's interesting how I feel I was made to live in the West, in the country, and yet I never did until now. My husband is good at finding wood, abandoned cut down trees, even in the streets of Los Angeles. I never heard of an electric wood splitter, that sound like a great thing to own. Will have to check on that.

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    1. Inger
      Electric log splitter..... loo at Home Depot. Very inexpensive. Also there is a video on YouTube of a girl using one. Look at that. Once the pieces are cut, I can easily split the big pieces up. I should do some ahead of time but I have enough wood in the smaller pieces. I used to live in large cities and I always yearned to get into more open spaces. You have more of that than I do now, since I sold the ranch but it is still a country town and I can run up the hill and be in the country. Keep warm this winter.

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  20. Before I moved to Florida, I had to cut 7 cords every summer. 4x4x8! It builds character. Now, I have enough character.

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    1. JJ
      Love to hear of a man who is full-up with character, You know the world expects great things from them. LOL

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  21. Hi Manzanita .. I need you over here - tree down! Storms lashing .. floods around and trees popping their roots ... but I'm safe, the car is safe .. but I think I'll move it in case the other tree comes down ...

    Love that smell of wood which has been cut -couldn't agree more ... thank goodness for power tools! You are certainly a lady of the land .. as I was brought up to be .. but I've softened! Cheers Hilary

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  22. Hilary
    Good heavens, are the cars safe anywhere in a storm like that? Is it safe to go out and move your car if trees are popping at the roots. There will be clean up and then you'll have a lot of wood piles in your neck of the woods (slight pun intended). I'm not really a lady of the land either as it's most easier to set the thermostat.

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  23. Kind of sounds like New Hampshire... there are two seasons, winter and getting ready for winter. Oh brrrrrrrr!

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    1. Bish
      Bish
      You must have lived in New Hampshire at one time. Mark Stein lives in NH. Do you know who I mean? A Canadian announcer who makes me laugh and laugh.
      Yup, takes a lot of preparation to get ready for winter. Actually I just toss straw on the roses and the wood is for an emergency. I like the hot water heat.... so nice and even.
      I used to be cold in the winter until I got my thyroid under control. Hands and feet are now toasty. Haha

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  24. Replies
    1. John
      You must always live where it's warm.

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  25. When we lived in Ireland, the fireplace was the prime source of heat. My son and I did a lot of wood chopping. Fortunately we had plenty of trees that fell in the winds. Fulfilling, but exhausting.

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  26. susan
    You've lived all around the world, seem like. Only time I've been to Ireland was early Oct and I froze. My daughter and I wore our flannel PJ's under our clothes we were so cold. Once when we were eating, I could see the lace on her PJ sleeve peeping out from her sweater. LOL

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  27. Didn't Pinocchio suffer from woodpiles?
    Luckily, he was able to visit a specialized proctologist.

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    1. Hahaha
      I think I know him. Dr. I. Seymour Pyle. His office is on the corner of Wood and Splinter.

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    2. Sorta lends new meaning to the term, 'woodpecker,' doesn't it?

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  28. We had a lovely village house some years ago. And there was a small wood-burning stove. The heat it produced was enough to warm up our 4 rooms. We loved to watch the fire dance, and the scent of burning wood was wonderful!
    Have a beautiful week, dear Manzi!
    Hugs!

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    Replies
    1. Zara
      I hope you soon again have your lovely village house. I know how much you would enjoy decorating it. I'll wager you were snug as a little bug in the warmth of the burning wood. Your posts are creative and exciting and they show your skill in designing. Take care, Love always

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    2. Thank you, Manzi! :) Your appreciation is always inspiring!
      We are a little stuck these days because of some circumstances. But i do hope that soon i could implement what I do on-line in our real village nest! :)

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  29. Enjoy your enlightening experience, Manzanita.
    Thank you for the comment you left on my blog yesterday.

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    1. Julia
      Thank you for you visit. I always enjoy your comments. My pleasure to share a conversation with you.

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  30. We don't need wood here in Ireland. In Germany we start collecting wood in late summer and it lasts until the next year.

    I like the smell of wood..

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    1. Jetta
      I would not cut trees unless they were already hopelessly dead and I had so many that were. It was from draught and the the beetles came and finished them off. what a pity.
      The fragrance of burning wood is delghtful..... in small controlled places.

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  31. I grew up with a huge pile of wood in the backyard we used. I loved it as a kid. But we don't in our own home now. Didn't think about that until now!

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    1. Morgan
      If everyone burned wood there would be no trees left. But when the trees die a natural death, they should be removed and that is where i get my wood.
      thanks for dropping by.

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  32. My grandfather chopped wood for their fireplaces. I remember sitting in front of it and hugging my knees and wondering where the small sparks flew off to.

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    1. Kittie
      Years ago natural gas for heat was not as extensive so many people cut their own wood.
      I bet your memories beside the fire with your grandfather and such a treasure. ummmm where do the sparks go? :)

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  33. Dear Manzanita, I don't do the wood-burning thing. Even in Minnesota with its cold and I didn't have a wood-burning stove or fireplace despite the fact that friends encouraged me to buy a good stove and put it in the kitchen where I could sit and read . . . and eat! But I knew that my thoughts are in the clouds lots of times and I'd probably go to bed upstairs and forget to stoke the fire--or whatever one has to do so that the house doesn't burn down! Peace.

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    1. Dee
      I have it for emergency only, mostly. so many of the trees died on my land from the lack of water and the beetles prey on the week trees. Had to get them cut anyway because they are a fire hazard. It's nice to have a man to do the fire thing and we don't. haha

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  34. Although we don't need to use it very often, we have a wood-burning fireplace... and LOTS of wood stacked up and ready to go. Georgia occasionally has ice storms that knock out the power for a day or two, and the fireplace does a great job keeping the house toasty. My hubby enjoys the atmosphere of a fire so much, he'll sometimes light one when it isn't all that chilly. (Then again, I'm the one whose end of the loveseat is right in front of the raging fire, so it's MY eyeballs that sizzle.) He has a wood-burning stove out in his man cave, too. (AKA garage)

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  35. Susan
    You live in the right climate for a fireplace. For the most part, they are simply deoration here. My wood stove is a powerful gutsy little thing that will heat the whole house and the upstairs. Keeps pipes from freezing at least but to tell the truth, I rarely use it.
    I bet Smarticus is happy with his man-cave, a place without curtains and have oil spills on the floor. Men need that
    Sizzling eyeballs.... hahahaha

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  36. Hi Manzanita .. I'd love to do the wood thing - but no .. living in a flat - it's electric or nothing! I'd love the thought of a woodburner .. but for now - I need to wait and move. Cosy evenings by the fire ... just wonderful - and those are amazing log piles! Cheers Hilary

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