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Wednesday, April 2, 2014

B is for Blessed Thistle


A-Z Challenge
My theme is herbs
B is for Blessed
Thistle

This plant has
been healing
people since
the bubonic
plague during
the Middle
Ages.

You may
recognize it
by some of it's other names, as Spotted Thistle, Holy Thistle
St Benedict Thistle. By itself, it has a strong, bitter taste so
is better combined in a recipe.  Here is a warning with
recipes. Don't use Blessed Thistle when taking other
plants from the compositae family (as daisies and asters).
Cross sensitivity may occur.

You can make this herb as a tea, a tincture or in capsule
form.

Medicinal Use: A good blood cleanser, strengthens
heart, aids circulation, alleviates inflammation of lungs, and
acts as a brain food for poor memory.

40 comments:

  1. for some reason thistle gets a bad wrap here... its beautiful and useful... whats wrong with that?!

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    Replies
    1. Actually it gets a bad rap here too, when in the fields. It spreads like wildfire and and if it's in a hay pasture,the cattle don't want it in the bales. I moved from a small ranch last summer and had a crop of it that the county threatened me if I didn't get rid of it. So few people know plants can also heal.

      Delete
  2. Thistle is pretty -- lovely color!
    Visiting from A to Z ~

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    Replies
    1. Wendy
      It really is a beautiful flower but prickly leaves.

      Delete
  3. I have used the Blessed Thistle in tea form before. I don't even think I knew the health properties... I just drank it because I could.
    Love you!

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    Replies
    1. Terry
      Isn't it amazing how many plants we can drink the tea and heal ourselves.
      Love you, kiddo

      Delete
  4. Butterflies and other insects like thistles too!

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    Replies
    1. Bish
      Oh.... a lot of things like thistle except my county. Ha

      Delete
  5. Loving the benefits list! Now I'm going back to see 'A' too. :)

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    Replies
    1. Rosey
      Morning to you. I hope you are finding some warm sunshine by now.

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    2. Freezing rain yesterday and the day before, but it's a'coming (the sunshine). It's just slower this year than most. ;)

      Delete
  6. I've thistles, so I think I'll gather me some for the next plague. Thanks for the medicinal tip!

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    Replies
    1. cleemckenzie
      One never knows when the next pandemic will arrive.

      Delete
  7. Which part do you use for the synergetic effect, the head, leaves or all of it?

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    Replies
    1. Spacerguy
      I've never collected this wild but used the commercial dried tea. I tried to look it up but all I could find right now is "various parts."

      Delete
  8. I love that you're doing this series on the power of plants. I would like to start using more herbs/plants but my body is so sensitive to them that I have to be really careful.

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    Replies
    1. Rubye
      When you take herbs it has to be under the care and instruction of a naturopath or the like. Many plants can be healing in the right amount but they can have a toxic limit. Right now I am having a toxic discharge and I feel like sh.... But I'm happy, happy happy because with this kind of healing.... no pain, no gain. you know that. I did call my naturopath gal this AM and she was delighted too. I've been working a long time for this reaction. Yaw Hoo

      Delete
  9. They used it for Bubonic Plague... is it me or are we moving backwards in terms of health and healing? If a Plague of any sort cropped up today most doctors would never even think of plants or herbs. ::sigh::

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    Replies
    1. Robin
      They keep talking about pandemics and if that happens.... yup they'll bring the needles out to vaccinate with who knows what.

      Delete
  10. If Blessed Thistle is so good for us then why can't we blessed-well buy it in the regular food shops? I bet the side effects are nowhere near as bad as those for antibiotics!

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    Replies
    1. Ros
      You know why we can't buy it...... if we could buy the herb, it would cost pennies. But if we buy the chemicals, big pharma gets thousands.

      Delete
  11. Pretty cool how it's been curing people that long! Wow...

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    Replies
    1. Keith
      It cures disease but allopathic doctors only prescribe the drugs so people become brain-washed into believing that if doctors don't use it, it can't be any good.

      Delete
  12. I've heard of this one, cleaning the blood and circulating away would be nice indeed. Never knew about the middle ages plague though, if a plague comes I'll stock up for sure.

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    Replies
    1. Pat
      Hahaha You never know when a pandemic will come along, either

      Delete
  13. Improves the memory? I will search for the seeds.

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    Replies
    1. Susan
      I've had the tea but never really know all the cures and when I saw memory..... I thought I'd better look some up again. Yay

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  14. Replies
    1. Joy
      As time goes on, I think we all could use a little brain food.

      Delete
  15. I love the color of the flower...

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    Replies
    1. Julia
      The flower is attractive but too bad it's regarded a noxious weed here.

      Delete
  16. A beautiful flower with many pluses. It certainly has a long history of healing. I don't think I have seen any here.

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    Replies
    1. Patti
      Probably they didn't reach Arkansas. They came here from Canada.

      Delete
  17. We get them here too, I leave them in the garden because I like the flower but I know they are not popular with the farmers.
    Merle..............

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    Replies
    1. Merle
      That's interesting that you have the thistles too. I'm so happy to be rid of the ranch because it was a lot of acres that had noxious weeds and we had to spray them or the county sprayed and charged us. Often I feel we are living in one big chemical world.

      Delete
  18. first time I've seen this one

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  19. "...a tea, a tincture or in capsule form.'
    Yes, but which part is used for which method?
    I'm not planning on making any tea or whatever, but this is something I've noticed in older herbal remedy books. "The plant can be used as....." and no further information is given. Without proper instruction on methods it's no wonder people trying things don't derive any benefit and claim alternative treatments are useless.

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  20. oh, this one I know! :) But have never taken and, more over, didn't know it's edible & has some healing properties! I love herbal teas anyway and often buy ready made mixes. I'll try to find out that may be there are some with blessed thistle..

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  21. Breastfeeding Aid and Support Supplement-Best Milk Boosting Lactation Formula Capsules for Nursing-Herbal Mother's Select Vitamins to Increase Milk Supply and Production-With Fenugreek seed, blessed thistle, and nursing supplement Breastfeeding Support!: Health & Personal Care.

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