Pages

Thursday, April 10, 2014

I is for Irish Moss


A-Z Challenge
My theme is herbs
I is for Irish Moss

The term Irish Moss
usually refers to a
seaweed (Chondrus
crispus) herb that
can be collected
at low tide on
the rocky
Atlantic coast-
line of NW
Europe and Canada.  (Not to be confused with the garden plant,
 also of the same name).

I order the fresh moss because of it's mucilaginous content.  It
takes a couple of days to go through the process of washing but
then I mix it in a blender and refrigerate it where it will stay
fresh for 2 to 3 weeks. It's wonderfully healthy to use as a
thickner for smoothies, gravies, puddings, etc.

Irish moss has become associated with the Irish potato
famine. The moss was consumed by desperate people in
order to ward off starvation and met with amazing results.
Not only did they manage to keep from starving, they were
supplied with minerals .

Medicinal  uses:  The herb is used for the common cold .
as it is very soothing to throat,  lungs and bronchites
and any time there is a call for a soothing gentle healing.
It's also soothing to ulcers. It can act as a blood
thinner so do not take it if you are on coumadin.  Irish
Moss can treat the thyroid with it's iodine content.

36 comments:

  1. I do take a form of seaweed for an iodine deficiency. It really stops fiber cystic breast conditions completely. Would this work the same way?
    Also this may be helpful since I am allergic to aspirin as a blood thinner.
    Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Patti
      I think one should take as much sea weed as they can get their hands on if they don't live near the ocean. I grew up in the mid-west where the soil is all iodine poor so we never get enough iodine in the food grown there. I recall seeing a lot of women with goiter when growing up. (Men don't need it as much as women)

      Delete
  2. Replies
    1. Holy ghost
      As I said to Patti, men don't suffer from lact of iodine as much as women.

      Delete
  3. Hi Manzanita .. Irish Moss came up in my 'research' but I don't think I included it in one of my posts .. so interesting to read all about the health benefits .. and the fact that this was the plant that helped the Irish survive the potato famine ..

    Definitely deserves a mention .. cheers Hilary

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hilary
      I like Irish Moss as a thickner. In fact I eat all the sea weed I can get down, each day. You live closer to the sea, I think.

      Delete
  4. This is a new one for me. As I'm now making green smoothies this might be a good addition.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bish
      It works in smoothies but it also might make it too thick. I like my smoothies on the liquid side. You do get a lot of minerals if you eat this or any sea weed every day.

      Delete
  5. I'll eat that over potatoes any day, hate those things with a passion haha nice little discovery I bet for the Irish

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Pat
      Heck yes, a discovery in gold. But that Irish Moss has to be washed thoroughly and it takes around 3 days but it's important to get the fishy taste out.

      Delete
    2. Probably the fishy taste would be okay if it is being used to thicken a sauce which will be poured over fish....

      Delete
  6. I am allergic to iodine (that which comes in the bottle) as well as the iodine in shellfish. The latter makes me very sad as, once upon a time, crab legs and shrimp were two of my favorite meals. Now... oh, the pain.

    I wonder if the iodine in this would be tolerable or if is just more of the same.... Any ideas?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Robin
      I've never heard of getting sad.... (would you call it a mild depression?) from seaweed because of the iodine. This may give you the same reaction too.

      Delete
  7. My only affiliation with moss is through seeing the big gorgeous moss trees in Florida. Those were amazing. I didn't know any variety of moss was good for anything though. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rosey
      This moss is a seaweed. There is also a garden plant called Irish Moss and the lighter green version is called Scotch moss.

      Delete
  8. That look similar to the one of the seaweeds the Mama collected in Monterey on our Sunday picnics. Hmmm, I think you gave me an idea for a P or S post. Anyway, I miss eating fresh seaweed.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Susieee
      I order this online (fresh) and it take about 3 days to was it, letting it soak in fresh water in the fridge inbetween. But if you don't, it tastes fishy. Happy to give you ideas.

      Delete
  9. Is Carrageenan the same? It is an Irish moss that is used to make pudding--it has to be.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Susan
      I think carrageenan is extracted from the red algae and has some controversy. It is said it is just used fro a thickner and has no nutritional value. I think when it's all complete in the seaweed, it's different. I've been taught there is a lot of nutritional value in Irish Moss. I love it in a chocolate pudding. I use cocao and agave for sweetner. Normally I prefer raw honey to agave as a sweetner. But my blender is so high power, it warms the pudding and I'm afraid it would remove the amino acids from the honey.

      Delete
    2. My Potters Cyclopedia has it listed as Irish Moss , Chondrus, Carragheen, Carrageen, Caragahen, same thing different spellings probably from different regions; Ireland, Scotland, Wales perhaps.

      Delete
  10. I have never tried the Irish Moss. Interesting that it works as a thickener.
    Bet you are busy getting ready for planting season. I know today I worked outside all day. LOVE!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Terry
      I have the biggest job ahead of me of getting all the rocks out of the garden. Boy it is going to be a tedious job. I started and got 2 days picking in but you can't even see it. I have to get it finished by memorial week-end as that is when we plant our gardens. I'll have to wor on it every day and some days, it isn't possible.
      You must be having warm weather. It's been so windy here and that annoys me.... cold too but I had to keep going. yuck to wind.

      Delete
  11. When I think about that famine, it amazes me what people did to survive.

    M. J. Joachim

    A to Z Challenge Co-Host
    Writing Tips
    Effectively Human
    Lots of Crochet Stitches




    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. M.J
      Thank you for devoting your time to hosting the challenge and for visiting my blog.
      Yes, the Irish people always have amazed me.

      Delete
  12. first time I've heard of it

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Adam
      I guess it's one of those sleeper sea-weeds.

      Delete
  13. Say, do the Irish make whisky form that?

    Blessings and Bear hugs!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rob Bear
      If they did it would have a fishy punch. Ha

      Delete
  14. I remember Irish Moss cough pastilles from when I was young. Every winter kids would come to school with either Irish Moss or Butter Menthol cough lollies.
    I've read about the seaweed, but didn't know it was used as a food during the potato famine.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. River
      Interesting cough lozens you had when little. What people won't try to eat when they are hungry and often, if it is organic, it's just what the body needs.

      Delete
  15. I know about this one. I've got tremendous problems with my lungs (inflammation issues) and I'm using all kinds of sea weed, especial fucoidan. It's expensive but I can't live without it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Blue Grumpster
      I eat as much seaweed as I can get my hands on. I have big stash.... huge.... of all types of seaweed. Fucoidan is found in hiziki, kombu and wakame..... these are some that I know of. I put a small piece (about 1 in) of kombu in everything that needs cooking.... rice especially. I use hijiki in in all salads. I think the fucoidan is found only in the brown algae but I also use the red.especially in soups.
      Sorry about the proble with your lungs and I sincerely hope the seaweed is helping. I have always cared for my own health with diet and herbs.

      Delete
    2. Thanks, Manzanita. It's spread from my lungs to my brain, but I'm doing OK now. You're the first person who's actually heard of fucoidan.

      Delete
  16. I haven't tasted this type of seaweed, but I'm in love with Japanese seaweed salad. I'll have to give this Irish Moss a try.

    ReplyDelete
  17. C Lee
    I would say you would have to blend Irish moss after it has be thoroughly washed (for around 3 days with soaking in the fridge) Kinda a pain ...... why I don't do it very often. But it has many minerals. I like it in chocolate pudding made with raw cocao or the powder. Most people think of pudding as "fattening" but I think of the raw cocao as being rich in magnesium . Think of what a powerhouse of nutrition that pudding is. You know the old cliche.... the proof is in the pudding.

    ReplyDelete
  18. I love mosses and this one is such an interesting plant! Only, I'm afraid I would not be successful to find it in my part of the globe :/ We use Sago as a natural thickener which is an extract from palms' stems.

    ReplyDelete