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Tuesday, April 29, 2014

Y is for Yellow Dock


A-Z Challenge
My theme is Herbs
Y is for Yellow Dock

So many of our
herbal plants
have been handed
to us by Native
Americans.  Yellow
Dock is another
medicinal plant that
has been
generously
brought to the
attention of
the Europeans
who settled
in America.

The yellow refers to the interior color of the
root, rather than the flowers or leaves. The darker
the yellow, the stronger the plants. Plants collected
in water are useless as the roots are light colored.
If you pick your own go for the deep yellow.
There are plenty to go around.  Tiz better to pick
your own than to cultivate it in your garden, as
in truth, this is a big ugly plant. Why introduce
it in your herb garden?

Medicinal  Use: The herb has great value  for
taking care of the skin.  Yellow Dock is one of
the best astringents and antiseptics, also good
for cuts, scraps, wounds and lacerations. A real
boon for chronic skin disease, a blood purifier,
enlarged lymph glands, liver ailments, sore
throats and anemia.

36 comments:

  1. Hi. I think I've seen this before.....oops, thought it was a weed. Sharon
    Shells–Tales–Sails

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    1. Sharon
      And they usuallly are thought of as weed because the medicinal value is unknown. I have some Native American friends/relatives and when they see a house plant, they ask what it cures.

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  2. I have seen this as well. It is a big ugly plant, but the yellow blooms rescue it.

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    1. Susan
      This grows all over the ranch...... and like wildfire.

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  3. Heard of this one too, that makes what, 5 at your zoo? lol Think it was on tv, as they used it for a wound.

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    1. Pat
      That 5 could have you leading the pac. Ha

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    2. You can rhyme and know your herbs? I need to lie down.

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  4. I originally read (for a half-second) it as "Yellow Duck", it would be a strange name for a plant

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    1. Adam
      Probably no more strange that Duck for a blog. Haha

      Delete
  5. As there are more and more changes to the health care system, along with a growing awareness of holistic or natural medicine, I can't help but wonder if herbalists are on their way to being back in vogue. I wouldn't be at all surprised if herbal shops didn't take off in the next decade. More and more people are recognizing that we are responsible for our own health.

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    Replies
    1. Robin, I hope your are right BUT the AMA is slowly trying to remove the herbs that really cure. I know an herbalist in Livingston, Mt who received such a whopper of a fine for making blood root salve (it really truly cures skin cancer) that he either quit entirely or went underground so far that no one can find him. What a pity.

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  6. I have never heard of this plant. I don't even know if it grows in our area.

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    Replies
    1. Bish
      I don't know if it does but it grows here in the mountains and you got mountains.

      Delete
  7. i am book marking your blog - so interesting to read more about herbs and their uses! awesome!
    happy y day!

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    Replies
    1. Tara
      Thank you and it's nice to meet you.

      Delete
  8. I'll have to get some of this and see if my skin likes it!

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    Replies
    1. C. Lee
      I have it in the tea bags and powder. My skin is beyond help but I hope you find it agreeable.

      Delete
  9. I have used this before, but in a capsule. I need to check and see if I can find it growing wild.
    Cold here!! Are you still picking rocks? Much love to you.

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    Replies
    1. Terry
      OMG.... I AM still picking rocks but yay I can see my vision taking shape. It will definitely be a contry garden with little paths, veggies, flowers and herbs AND Ta dum....chickens and chicken poop. Every day my head swims with trying to get all the tid-bits fitted in. Today I had the find of all finds.... an old wooden wine barrel, all beit with the metal thingies that hold it together. It will go in the tool shed and have about 1/4 of it sand. I read the tip a while ago. Stick the hoes, racks, shovets, etc in and the sand helps remove the dirt and keep them sharp. Good idea, huh?
      Yes, it's been a bear for cold but I still had to pick away. Ha
      Today it was not so windy and the sun was shining. Did your peppers freeze the other night?

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  10. ^^ Terry is awesome...the herbal guru. :)

    One more letter!!

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    1. Rosey
      I call Terry if I'm ever in doubt aout herbs.

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  11. Fascinating! I learned something new today. :)

    Madeline @ The Shellshank Redemption
    Minion, Capt. Alex's Ninja Minion Army
    The 2014 Blogging from A-Z Challenge

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    1. Madeline
      Thank you for serving on the A-Z committee. You minions do a bang-up job.

      Delete
  12. Hey Manzanita,

    I know of this one. I have a friend in Hope, British Columbia who is very knowledgeable about this sort of stuff. Those native North Americans have left a profound impact on my life.

    Gary

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    1. Gary
      They are responsible mostly for the herbal information being passed on. That is where I began to realize that real heling can be achieved with herbs.

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    2. Is there a book you'd recommend, me being chronically ill and stuff...

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  13. This is a new one to me. Think I will check to see if it grows in my area. Kind of makes you wonder how the Indians learned to use these plants. Probably accidental discovery passed down for eons.

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    1. Patti
      I wonder who had to try the new herbs first. I'd rather not be a king/queen or a controversial person who had to have a food taster.

      Delete
  14. Ah, this herb, I used long ago as a tea when my eczema first reared up. I can't recall if it helped. I ought to try it again.

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    1. Susiee
      I drink it as a tea most mornins My muscle testing wanted it several programs ago.

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  15. Replies
    1. That makes three.
      Holy ghost....You rock althoughI don;t have a cllue

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  16. I am impressed now that we are at the opposite ends Finally/

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  17. Is this the one where the young leaves can be used as a substitute for spinach?
    It's a world wide weed, this one, grows anywhere, everywhere, the flowers are pretty.

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  18. I think I have seen this before when I was younger in the fields of NE Kentucky. Or at least it looked a lot like it!

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  19. Enlarged lymph glands... I know all I need to know about those. I never ceases to amaze me how much nature has to offer. I'd be tempted to say it's all there.

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