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Tuesday, April 22, 2014

S is for Skullcap


A-Z Challenge
My theme is Herbs
S is for Skullcap

For hungreds of
years, Native
Americans used
Skullcap as a
nervine for
anxiety and
insomnia.

What a stroke
of luck to have
Skullcap for
their nerves at
a time in
history when
European terrorists were chomping up bits of their land.

Medicinal Use:  For blood clots in the brain, inflammation,
seizures, stroke, viral infections and to lower
cholesterol.
It's a sure fire treatment for any nervous system
malfunction of a mild or chronic nature.  In combinations
with ginseng, it is very effective in treating DT"s of
alcoholism.
It is usually more effective to combine Skullcap with other
complementary herbs.

37 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. A Daft Scots Lass
      Lots and lots of herbs that will cure,

      Delete
  2. As effective as it might be, I bet it didn't work to calm the nerves in the scenario you stated. Can you even imagine?

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    Replies
    1. Rosey
      They were so trusting and friendly (at first) and showed many of the settlers how to use the plants for medicine.

      Delete
    2. I believe you. My husband is Am. Indian, and his family is so so so so so friendly, they love to tell stories to anyone who will listen (for hours). My husband is not, haha, must be his white mom. ;) But his dad is, and his grandparents, aunts, cousins, etc. on his dad's side. Def. a prevailing theme to want to talk and help others. And they're still very into crafts, pow wows, Native American spirituality, and using natural remedies. Some things don't change all that much over time. :)

      Delete
  3. Replies
    1. Karen
      If you are new to herbs it is best to take it under the advice/care of a natralpath person.

      Delete
  4. I agree with Rosey. Back in the 90s I read several books about Native American tribes. After, I spent a great deal of time pondering what they could have done differently to change the outcome. Of course, banding together and fighting the French and English comes to mind (rather than taking sides with one or the other). But, I am not convinced it would have changed anything. They were outgunned, but worse yet they had no immunity to the diseases that the Europeans brought with them. More tribes were killed off due to disease. Unfortunately, not even their herbs could save them...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Robin
      When you think about it, it's odd that some of the Indians medicinal plants couldn't cure the diseases brought by the settlers. I don't think the Indians knew they were losing their liberty and land, they were too trusting at first.

      Delete
    2. I've read stories of how the Indians were purposely given blankets etc that were ridden with germs of measles, smallpox etc, so when the Indians fell ill it was in epidemic proportions. Their slower acting herbal remedies would have been useless, which of course is what the white man wanted.

      Delete
  5. I have head about this, but never tried it that I know of.
    Rain here today and suppse to be crummy for the next couple of weeks. I was hoping those nice days would stay.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Terry
      I felt better today and started picking rocks...... I did about 2 wheelbarrows and it started raining here too. It was a hard rain and we really need it but there goes my rock picking. Ha

      Delete
    2. You probably need to rest that back for awhile longer. Maybe the rain was telling you something.

      Delete
  6. With my nerve crap it may be a good one to try indeed at my feed

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Pat
      That might help because it's for nerves. Check with your natural path. I've never tried it but I know White willow Bark really works. I hurt my back lugging rocks and I had both the loose and caps in my herb stash. I made tea with the loose and took the caps for one day and the next day, I felt much better. It was kinda like a miracle.

      Delete
    2. Are you suggesting white willow for nerves? Or am I reading you wrong? I've used white willowbark as tea for pain relief and anti-inflammatory purposes, such as you did with your back.

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  7. So many wonderful things growing in the wild!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bish
      I agree. I wih I had more knowledge of all the medcinal plants.

      Delete
  8. yeah they needed some for when all the pilgrims came for their "religious freedom"

    never trust a puritan

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    Replies
    1. Adam
      Hahaha
      No I won't. They come and take your land.

      Delete
  9. I never knew that! Nice to meet and connect through atozchallenge. http://aimingforapublishingdeal.blogspot.co.uk/

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    Replies
    1. Comley
      Thanks for stopping by. I will visit your blog shortly.

      Delete
  10. You picked a great subject for the A to Z challenge, I didn't make a plan and my posts are random and a bit late.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Teri
      Either way seems to work. Sometimes the ramdom posts are more interesting because they are not so limited. I'll drop in on your blog.

      Delete
  11. You make a good point about perhaps they really needed it thanks to us. This month has flown. Can't believe it is all ready "S" time.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Patti
      I just said that to someone else this AM. I have about a month to get the rocks out of my garden if I want vegetables this year. I felt good today and started picking rocks and it began raining. A hard rain...... so I had to put my tools away and come in the house. We need rain here but I also want the rocs "gone."

      Delete
  12. I had to put on my thinking cap and then I understood what Significance your post was. That would be native North Americans, correct?

    Take care, dear lady.

    Gary :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Gary
      Today is earth day.... thinking cap day. Yes, it would be Native North Americans. Hope you are enjoying your vacation from blogging.

      Delete
  13. Holy ghost
    They either had skullcap or aspen trees.

    ReplyDelete
  14. I wonder how the herb got its name. The flower doesn't look like a skull.
    Pretty flower, it is.

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    Replies
    1. Susiee
      I've wondered too. Perhaps I have to dig a little deeper.

      Delete
  15. I have never heard of that one.
    Merle........

    ReplyDelete
  16. Scullcap aka madweed, which suggests it might send you mad instead of calming you down.
    I don't need this one, I'm the calmest person I know.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Ah, to have a good medicine doctor again. Oh wait! Will they give patients more than 5 minutes to consult?

    Sorry. Really am enjoying these posts. And, since I do plant herbs in my garden, I'm making notes for the next season.

    Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Happy belated Earth Day.
    Very interesting post, Manzanita...
    This flower is gorgeous.

    ReplyDelete
  19. It is amazing how all this knowledge existed for ??, and the Europeans considered this to be the stuff of barbarians. How haughty and prideful.
    Technology defeated all the tribes. Technology and pride.

    ReplyDelete