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Tuesday, April 15, 2014

M is for Mistletoe


A-Z Challenge
My theme is Herbs
M is for Mistletoe

Mistletoe has a
more lofty purpose
than enticing a
holiday kiss.

This is a
parasetic plant
that thrives on
Juniper trees in
the U.S.

Some of it's many medical uses include lowering blood pressure.
It's a relaxant, an immune stimulant and anti-cancer herb.  It's
also used in treatment of lungs, ovarian and other cancerous
 tumors. It's quite effective after radiation treatment in
re-establishing the immune system.

Mistletoe is also terrific for migraines and considered one
of the best non-addictive tranquillizers in the herb
kingdom.

37 comments:

  1. Hi! Fellow A to Z challenger :)
    This may be a really ignorant question but I am curious as to how you ingest Mistletoe?
    Is it in like a tea, or just in your house? Clearly i'm not a herb connoisseur :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. Kelsey
    The most common way would be dried and in a tea. It would most likely not be found in your kitchen spice cupboard.

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  3. Wow, I didn't know that about mistletoe!! Very Interesting.

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    Replies
    1. Cathrina
      Thank you for visiting and leaving a nice comment.

      Delete
  4. This one I knew as I saw it as I went all facts back when at my zoo. 1 out of 24 so far isn't bad huh? lol

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  5. You had me at 'good for migraines.'

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    Replies
    1. Rosey
      Do you mean you have migraines?

      Delete
  6. I think the only ones I've seen in person are the artificial ones

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    Replies
    1. Adam
      I had some growing in my yard but it was in the form of a bush. I think our climate is too harsh but it did last for many years.

      Delete
  7. I will look for this one... at the health food store???

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    Replies
    1. Robin
      Health food stores may have it. Amazon carries it in bulk and a tincture.

      Delete
  8. I knew it had some medicinal uses, but not all of these! We don't see it in the juniper/cedar around here. We see it oaks.

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    Replies
    1. Bish
      I suppose it just needs a tree to attach itself to.

      Delete
  9. Well well well. I did not know that. As a migraine sufferer I shall investigate Mistletoe further.

    Thanks, Manzanita!

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    Replies
    1. Wendy
      Investigate well. I've never used it but I know it's sold on Amazon and most likely in some health food stores.

      Delete
  10. I guess I had no idea Mistletoe was even edible. Good to know.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Terry,
      Well I think it might be poison to "eat" it but a small amount in a tea is OK. But I know what makes you well..... you just eat the whole bowl. Haha

      Delete
  11. Hey Terry
    How are you doing? I seem to be moving backward in place of going forward. The weather won't let me work outside. Cold, windy and misting.

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  12. Hmmm, I had no idea. I might be tempted to just grab the mistletoe and take it home with me. :-)

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    Replies
    1. Susieee
      To heck with the kissing for you.... you just want it for tea. Haha

      Delete
  13. Hi Manzanita,

    Mistletoe may well be just what I need. I get a raging headache when all those adoring lady fans of mine insist on me kissing them under the mistletoe. Seriously, most informative and thank you, dear lady.

    Gary :)

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    Replies
    1. Gary
      Poor dear Gary. All that kissing causes such a headache but lucky you can just make some tea out of it.

      Delete
  14. Wow, that is one dandy little plant. Who would have guessed. I have a friend who is a migraine sufferer. I will check it out and let her know. Thanks.

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    Replies
    1. Patti
      And the best part ..... if all else fails you can always kiss under it. Ha

      Delete
  15. It's not common here, I didn't know mistletoe was a herb.
    Merle...........

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    Replies
    1. Hi Merle
      A lot of the mistletoe they use for "kissing" at Christmas time is plastic. Haha

      Delete
  16. An anti-cancer herb... That's music to my ears. My dad died of a brain tumor, so I'm a bit scared of getting one too.

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    Replies
    1. Blue grumpster
      I'm sorry. That's tough. And I guess cell phones pressed to our ear isn't much help either. I always use mine on speaker when I have to talk on the dumb thing. Mostly I use the old fashioned land line.

      Delete
    2. Thanks. Yes, I often wonder about cell phones. Do you reckon we could sue somebody?

      Delete
  17. Replies
    1. Holy Ghost
      And you thought it was just for kissing.

      Delete
  18. Hi Manzanita .. I'd always thought mistletoe was poisonous .. so this was interesting to read about .. I'd no idea of its benefits .. cheers Hilary

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  19. Sounds like such a beneficial plant! I also knew nothing of it, except may be its being a kissing props :)) I'm not sure I've ever seen it on sale either...

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  20. The photo looks more like holly, altho I don't go looking for holly or mistletoe.
    I am learning a lot from your A to Z posts this year, and I also loved the dances from last year!

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  21. That is very interesting about mistletoe. Good for migraines and brings on tranquility!

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  22. Didn't know about the qualities of most of the herbs you've discussed for the A-Z.

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