Pages

Thursday, April 2, 2015

B is For Bones


My theme for the
A-Z Challenge is
Aging into Longevity

Bones, oh bones
Oh dem dry bones.

As one advances in
age, strong bones
will support the
body during the
bumps and falls. One way to maintain strong bones
is with Bone Marrow broth that can be used in
soups, stews or in a delicious drink.

I buy marrow bones at the health food store because
there, you'll find bones of grass-fed animals. To
extract the powerful juices of the marrow bone, it
will take at least 18 hours of slow cooking.
Obviously this does not fit into busy lives, so bring
out the old slow cooker (also known as crock pot).

I cook marrow bones in a pressure cooker for 1 1/2
hours. Whatever method you choose, always add a
couple tb. of apple cider vinegar, perhaps a half
an onion and some carrots for flavor. Then put
the broth in the fridge and skim off the white fat
that forms on top.  What's left is a purely nutritious
jelly-like food that will keep in the fridge for
a month.

My body can't seem to get enough of that
yummy broth and it's a perfect companion
to my breakfast.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Here's  P.S. to this as people seem confused.
Simmer the bones for 18 to 30 + hours
Toss bones or give them to the pup
Strain liquid and put in fridge
A white fatty top will form when it's cold.
I skim this off and don't use it.
The stuff underneath may be jelly-like or
liquidey. I take a couple of tb. of that and
heat it ....add more liquid if you want or
drink as it. I always add more salt.
It is soooo yummy in the morning.
You can use the broth in soups too,
or whatever. Lots of vids on YT.
Look it up.

47 comments:

  1. Hmmm. I may just have to try this!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bish
      I added a p.s. to the post or looks at the vids on YT.

      Delete
  2. Hi Manzanita - if I had family I'd do that .. but I always use the bones - and craved a good stock with veg when I was ill, and then after my hip op earlier this year .. the bone jelly is so so good .. cheers Hilary

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hilary
      That is marvelous for mending bones. Good medicine.

      Delete
  3. So THAT is what that weird jelly on our turkey used to be. I could never figure it out! Marrow jam! :)

    Alex Hurst, A Fantasy Author in Kyoto
    Out of Print, Fiction authors and their shorts

    A-Z Blogging in April Participant

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Alex
      You got it. Most people don't like it in the jelly form, including me.

      Delete
  4. Thanks for this. I am going to try it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Karen
      I added a P.S. to the post and there are lots of vids about it on YT.

      Delete
  5. Sounds like a good way indeed, not sure I'd like the look of it though all souped up lol but keeping my brittle bones good isn't a bad thing

    ReplyDelete
  6. I think I need someone else to make this and put it in my foods secretly. I know it is good for you, and people used to get more of it just because of the way foods were prepared and stored before we messed them all up. But I don't even like the looks or texture of Jello...

    Donna Smith
    A to Z Challenge
    www.mainelywrite.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Donna
      You don't have to eat the jelly.... like eating jello. No, I'd probably gag at that too. I make it into a liquid by heating it after it's been in the fridge. I added a PS to the post and there are a lot of vids on YT.

      Delete
    2. Yes, I figured that, but I don't know if I could even get to take a dollop of it to heat... I'm not even liking to cook fried eggs...

      Delete
  7. So, NOW I know what you meant by your comment at my place. Your bones, though? Much more interesting (and useful) than skeletal erections.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Al
      I double laughed when I saw "your bones." Ha

      Delete
  8. I feel really stupid, because others seem to have read this and caught on quite easily... but is this a broth or a jelly-like food? Or can you use it both ways?

    ReplyDelete
  9. Robin
    I am trying to make the posts very short because I think most of this stuff is boring. Thanks for asking. After it's been in the fridge, it will be a jelly form. I reheat a couple tb. and drink it. (My father always loved to eat the jelly just like it is. I think that would make me gag) I added a PS to the post and there are many vids on YT of how to make bone broth. I'm actually surprised that this many people are interested in such an old-fashion food idea. People just don't have the time to simmer bones for hours. I did a huge kettle-full yesterday and I just put the flame on low and added a little water a few times. It simmered for thirty some hours and I really like the flavor from that more than the crock pot or the pressure cooker. But they all work. I know you are interested in good health.

    ReplyDelete
  10. I read a blog post of a woman who had myriad health issues and slowly brought herself back to health by doing this. It is supposed to have fabulous health benefits.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Orneryswife
      Right. I think it's especially important to have strong bones as we cross into the land of the elderly

      Delete
  11. This sounds delicious! I remember the gel in the bottom of the roasting pan, and it was great!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Susan
      Not too many people eat pork these daiys but I remember the fresh pork at my grandparents after grandpa butchered. OMG that was good. I used to watch grandpa feed the pigs a mash with whey he concocted and did they love it. No chemicals for those pigs. Your roasting pan made me hungry. I tried to get liver at the health food store yesterday and the meat dept. guy said he would cut up pig liver today. I better get over there. Ha

      Delete
    2. I haven't had liver in several years, I think it's about time I had some. How do you prepare yours? I slice mine very thinly, dip it in flour then fry it quickly so it is crisp on both sides, usually serve it with mashed potatoes and gravy made from bone jelly.

      Delete
  12. My grandmother had osteoporosis so bone loss has become a concern for me as I age, I will certainly give this a try.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. martine
      Now is the time to begin. I need stronger bones, that is for sure. Good luck.

      Delete
  13. I've not heard of this before, but I'm always on the look out for new slow cooker recipes to pass to my husband. I'll have to let him know about this one.

    Cait @ Click's Clan

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Click
      This really isn't a recipe...... it's just a way to get the marrow out of the bones for broths, soups and hot drinks.

      Delete
  14. Sounds worthy of a shot. Now to find a place that sells it. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. David
      Probably the same as Swanson's broth. "

      Delete
  15. Not sure I can find a place in my tiny town that sells grass fed beef bones. I will try as I am of the "age" where it would be helpful. Thanks for the instructions.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Patti
      Sometimes a local butchershop might have meat from local ranchers that just graze cattle and no feed lot beef.

      Delete
  16. Dem bones, dem bones need calcium and thats a universal law!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Spacerguy
      If the universe demands calcium, it's good enough for me.

      Delete
  17. I actually do this for my elderly dog (15) and my elderly mother (86),,, we have a great health food store that sells marrow bones in packages

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ivy Walker
      How caring of you to make the bone broth for your mother and your pet. I'm sure they are feeling no pain because of your efforts.
      I tried to visit your blog but it wouldn't let me in.

      Delete
  18. Yummmm. Soup bone soup was one of my favorite winter soups when I was a kid. The Daddy would buy beef bones for the Mama to cook with cabbage, potatoes, carrots, onions, and garlic. How I loved chewing on the cartilage and sucking the marrow out of the bones.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Susie
      My father always sucked the marrow out of the bones too. Best part, he would say. All that great food you had as a child still serves you well today.

      Delete
  19. I've never heard of this. My bones are good at last check. I eat a lot of yogurt.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Susan
      Bones are special but so is everything in our body. You know your good health.
      Cheers

      Delete
  20. Replies
    1. Holy Ghost
      You mean like the Tin Man and an oil can? Me too.

      Delete
  21. Woo hoo! You're doing the A-Z. I missed your posting!! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rosie
      Yea, I wasn't going to but it's the only one I do during a year.

      Delete
  22. I've simmered bones before, lots of times. The lovely flavoured jelly I get is used as a soup base, stored until I need it, (sometimes in the freezer) then I melt it, add water and vegetables, a little pearl barley, simmer until barley is cooked, serve with crusty bread and butter. Yum.

    ReplyDelete
  23. What a happy coincidence! I had dinner at a dear friend's house last night and she has been telling me how she's gotten into making and eating broths lately. She showed me a book on broths and the broth gel she makes and keeps in the fridge. After visiting with her and reading your post, I am officially a convert. Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  24. I just had my bone densitiy test done. I think they will have the results Friday.

    ReplyDelete
  25. It's yummy too? Well, I'll take your word for it.

    ReplyDelete